DONATIONS NEEDED
            PLEASE

Understanding  the Dreyer’s plans to develop Capital Hill










For Doctors Tom and Cynthia Dreyer,

the reasons for building on their 17 acre

property atop Capital Hill were simple.


The Register Guard reports that,  for 33 years the Dreyers lived quietly in a simple structure tucked back in a dark, beautiful wooded site on the north side of the 14 acres that they have gradually consolidated.  Their cyclone boarder fence creates the souther boarder of Hendricks Park. Less than a year ago the Dreyers moved into the 1916 three-story, pink stucco Prairie-Mission style mansion, widely known and loved by the Eugene community as The Pink House. “It’s one of the best views in town,” said Tom Dreyer, a retired plastic surgeon, said on a recent afternoon from the deck of the century-old house.* “This is Shangri-La here, above the clouds,” Dreyer said, gesturing to his property’s sweeping views over Eugene.** The house commands the crest of  Capital Hills Dome at 950 feet and its (original) 4 acre estate includes all the gently sloped land over 900ft. Below 900 feet the ridge drops off dramatically.

“At first our thought was to keep it from being developed, but eventually we

said it was time to do something to bring back the neighborhood,” Dreyer said. “It’s better if we develop it. We live here.”* Rather than leave the land as is, “I guess I think other people deserve a chance to live up here,” he said. The Dreyers motivation to give others the chance to enjoy the hilltops beauty reflects the origins of Hendricks Park.



































































In 1906, Martha and Thomas Hendricks deeded 47 acres of their property to the City of Eugene and the city then purchased an additional 31 acres to complete Eugene's first city park, Hendricks Park was born. The Hendricks gift and the Cities wise contribution has given hundreds of thousands of people access to 78 acres of wilderness within the city, it’s views to the valleys down below and views of its majestic slopes from all around. It would seem that the Dreyers could easily achieve their objective by simply following the Hendricks lead. Forest Park in Portland should be their guide. Forest Park is a precious natural treasure that plays a major role in the quality of life enjoy in the Portland-metro region, contributing to clean water and air, while also offering an abundance of outdoor recreation in the heart of a rapidly-growing urban area. *** 


Tom and Cynthia, please follow the example of the Cottrell Family:


PRIME PARCEL OF LAND DONATED TO FOREST PARK CONSERVANCY: Forest Park Conservancy is beneficiary of a portion of Cottrell refuge

 PORTLAND, Ore.― Forest Park Conservancy (FPC) is the beneficiary of three acres of the Cottrell refuge, a small wooded area adjacent to Skyline Blvd., in Portland’s west hills. The land was donated by the Cottrell family, who have owned it since the 1949. The family also recently gave the adjoining eight acres, plus the family’s custom-built former home, to the University of Oregon’s School of Architecture.

 “My father never wanted the property to be parceled and sold off for development; he dreamed of leaving it to future generations,” said Marcy Cottrell Houle, family member and also author of One City’s Wilderness: Portland’s Forest Park. “He instilled a love of nature in all of us, and for my sisters and me, it’s wonderful to know it will be well-cared for and protected.”****


The Dreyers are honored members of our community and we hope the will hear this plea. In the meantime, the community is mobilizing. Many residents in the Fairmount and Laurel Hill Valley neighborhoods (FNA and LHVC) are deeply concerned about a proposed housing development and on August 5, 2014 formed a Joint Response Committee to review the developer’s application for compliance with Eugene Planning Code and to prepare a formal response in the City approval process. The committee has enlisted several professionals, including a lawyer, a forester, a geotechnical engineer, and a traffic engineer to assist in their response. As the review has proceeded, concerns continue to grow regarding such key issues as: the large number of homes, extensive tree removal, landslides and drainage, traffic safety during and after construction, and especially emergency response in and out of the area, including the adjacent neighborhoods. The Joint Response Committee hasten working diligently with goals: (1) to evaluate the application for compliance with Eugene Planning Codes, (2) to assess impacts on the two neighborhoods, (3) to prepare a report to be entered into Eugene’s official record which is accessed by the Public Hearings Official prior to making his/her recommendation for approval/denial.


At the May 16, 2017 Fairmount Neighborhood Asssociation general meeting, a Joint Response Committee resolution was amended and passed by a large majority of those attending (67-5) to “recommend the proposed PUD be denied unless the concerns [listed in the resolution] above can be adequately addressed by the developer.”


This approved resolution was submitted into the official City record.


The committee, now, has sufficient evidence to conclude that the proposed PUD would have a serious negative impact on our neighborhoods and would not comply with crucial Eugene Planning Code requirements. For example, the proposed PUD:


        1) Divides the 13.63 acres into 34 lots (with up to 38 dwelling units), with many lots’ buildable portion located on steep slopes, which would be vulnerable to increased geological instability;


        2) Requests the logging of up to 450 trees (over 50% of existing trees), increasing landslide potential and exposing trees in Hendricks Park and along the Ribbon Trail to wind-throw or other damage. The proposed PUD would be located within the area of the South Hills Study adopted by the City of Eugene to encourage preservation of trees and vegetation within ridgeline areas for parks, open space, and connecting trails, like the Ribbon Trail. The Study states: “this area constitutes a unique and irreplaceable community asset.”


3) Falsely claims to provide a variety of housing for all income levels. However, lot development and utility infrastructure costs could be over $200,000 per lot. Each owner would then have to build a custom home. Total costs per home could easily exceed $600,000, more than twice Eugene’s median home sales price;


4) Jeopardizes safety and emergency services response time throughout the existing roadways and the proposed new private PUD street.  The narrow primary access streets of Fairmount Blvd., Spring Blvd. and Capital Dr. provide about 123 households primary ingress/egress for all personal motor vehicles, commercial service vehicles and emergency response equipment. This network of streets is already challenging for vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, and emergency response; it would be made worse if as many as 30 more dwellings (a 24% increase in neighborhood units) were added at the top of Capital Hill, and it would be a crisis if evacuation of the area would be required.


The final report will present substantial evidence that the proposed PUD would have dangerous, damaging, and irreversible impacts on our entire community. The report will be submitted for the Public Hearing on May 7, 2018. Please Attend! Important details will be shared on this site as they develop. Also, for greater detail See: https://safecapitalhill.com/




























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Capital Hill and Hendricks Park are visited and loved by thousands of people beyond the Fremont and Laurel Hill Valley Communities and the Capital Hill Coalition has been established as an umbrella organization to reach out to, mobilize and coordinate all friends of Capital Hill.


Many residents in the Fairmount and Laurel Hill Valley neighborhoods are deeply concerned about a proposed housing development that would forever alter the character of our area.

 

The Capital Hill Planned Unit Development (CHPUD) would be situated on approximately 14 acres at the top of Capital Drive on the border between Fairmount and Laurel Hill Valley, contiguous with Hendricks Park on the north and the Ribbon Trail on the east. Application now proposes 34 lots with up to 38 dwelling units.

 

Concerns continue to grow regarding such key issues as: the large number of homes, extensive tree removal, landslides and drainage, traffic safety during and after construction, and especially emergency response in and out of the area, including the adjacent neighborhood.

 

Our Joint Response Committee (FNA and LHVC) was formed to review the developer’s application for compliance with Eugene Planning Code and to prepare a formal response in the City approval process.

To assist us, we have enlisted several professionals, including a lawyer, a forester, a geotechnical engineer, and a traffic engineer.

 

The Public Hearing date is now tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, January 10th, 2018. The Hearings Official will decide whether to “approve, approve with conditions, or deny the application.”

 







We are asking for donations of any size to pay for this legal and professional expertise, as well as for possible future appeals.

 

The Laurel Hill Valley Citizens neighborhood association is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit corporation, so your donation is tax deductible.

 

We truly appreciate your contribution to our community efforts.  

 

 

 Please make your tax-deductible donation payable to:

 

                                    Laurel Hill Valley Citizens

 

Mail to:                     Laurel Hill Valley Citizens

                                    c/o Cathy Johnson

                                    2490 Malabar Drive

                                    Eugene, Oregon  97403

                                                                                                                                                                                      Be sure to write “ CHPUD Response” in the memo section of your check.






*Capital conflict

Residents on Capital Drive push back against housing project

By Elon Glucklich

The Register-Guard

Monday, March 27, 2017, Page A1


**Hilltop housing plan

A Eugene couple seeks to build 20 homes on about 12 acres abutting Hendricks Park

By Christian Wihtol

The Register-Guard

FRIDAY, JAN. 3, 2014, PAGE A8 - see: http://projects.registerguard.com/rg/news/local/30924200-75/dreyer-development-hill-schirmer-eugene.html.csp


 *** http://www.forestparkconservancy.org/


****  http://www.forestparkconservancy.org/pdf/Cottrelldonation.pdf

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